Writing a melody to a chord progression

Go To Hookpad Hookpad Hookpad is software that simplifies songwriting by helping you choose chords that sound good together and guiding you to write a good melody. Hookpad is an intelligent musical sketchpad that helps you create amazing chord progressions and melodies.

Writing a melody to a chord progression

Major chords sound solid, happy, and satisfying. A huge number of songs, especially in pop and rock, have been written using only those three chords. The other three chords, ii, iii, and vi, are "minor" chords, and are named using lower-case Roman numerals. Minor chords generally sound sad, restless, or dramatic.

Enough theory, get to the song already There are lots of ways to go about writing a song. You can start with the chords and add a melody, or start with a melody and add chords that harmonize, or write both portions at the same time, or any combination.

Pick a chord progression First you need a chord progression, which is just a list of the chords your song uses, in order. A measure is four beats in our song, and each chord in our progression will cover one measure.

So right away, you know you want to start and end your song with the I chord. Some of them will sound jarring after others. The rules to remember here are You can jump from I to anywhere else. You can stay in one box as long as you like before moving on. For example, you could simply pick a sequence of four chords from the map, and repeat them over and over during your song.

Here, I’ve composed a basic melody and went through an entire sketching process of writing progressions from: 1 chord, 2 chords, 3, 4, 8, a 16+ chord progression; downward and upward motion; and finally, extended chords. For those times when you’re writing a song and can’t find the right chord to complete a progression, this technique – using applied music theory – will help you discover . The melody is made up mostly of chord tones. Note that especially on beats with a strong stress, chord tones are used. The melody is almost completely consonant, with a few partially consonant notes, and few (if any) dissonant notes.

It sounds boring now, but adding a melody will liven things up. Or make sure that every fourth chord in your progression is the same. Or that chords four and twelve are the same, and eight and sixteen are the same. Or whatever you like, keeping in mind that sets of 4 are good.

Examples Here are a few chord progressions you might want to listen to or use. Work in measures A measure is four beats in the song. To make things a little more interesting, though, you can work with half-beats. In Melody Assistant, a beat is a quarter note, and a half-beat is an eighth note.

In mTooth, a beat is note length 4, and half-beats are note length 2. The first beat of each measure is the most important. The other beats, and anything that happens on the half-beats, are less important.

writing a melody to a chord progression

Organize your melody by picking note lengths that add up to four beats eight half-beats for each measure. Use notes from your chords Each chord in your progression matches up with one measure in your song. You can also use those same notes in another octave.

Most of the time, you want to keep the distance from one note to the next to two steps letter names or less, for instance from C to E. Using notes in different octaves can help keep your melody from leaping from place to place.

writing a melody to a chord progression

On the other hand, your song will be boring if you always just run up and down the letters the scale one at a time. Bigger jumps are like spice: Repeat things sometimes To help make your song sound organized, repeat things sometimes, maybe with a little variation.How to write melody over chord progression?

So the last few times I have sat down to produce I end up putting together a chord progression that I like. After this I spend about hours trying to come up with a melody or a lead to go over the chord progression, with no success. try writing a chord progression to fit a melody. It might. The Key of a Track can have an important effect on its emotional impact.

Choosing whether to use a Major or Minor scale will determine which notes sound “in . The melody is made up mostly of chord tones. Note that especially on beats with a strong stress, chord tones are used.

The melody is almost completely consonant, with a few partially consonant notes, and few (if any) dissonant notes. There are 2 main ways of composing a melody through improvisation- writing a motif/riff and writing a melody over a chord progression.

Motif writing (or motivic development) This is quite a traditional way of writing and developing a melody. Hookpad guides you to write a great melody.

Sometimes knowing what notes to use in the melody can be the hardest part. Once you've chosen some chords, Hookpad can help you pick notes for your melody by highlighting the notes that are in the chords you've written.

For those times when you’re writing a song and can’t find the right chord to complete a progression, this technique – using applied music theory – will help you discover your best options and help you complete your song.

Writing Chord Progressions: How To Find The Next Chord When Writing A Song